We Can Not Afford To Continue The War On Drugs


The Vice President visited with South American leaders but continued the hardened stance against drug legalization despite opposing opinions from the other side.  While the US government, in their fight against drugs, has proven its disregard for its own citizens they have also shown that they are willing to sacrifice over 50,000 Mexicans as well as thousands in other Latin countries, murdered, some decapitated and dumped in public streets.  By continuing this costly, bloody and utterly disastrous War on Drugs they have proven that they will stop at nothing to continue their agenda.    Over 40 years of continual war on drugs has cost this country dearly and many ask is it really worth it?

With all that is going on in the country today it’s no wonder that people start to ignore some issues and continue on with more pressing matters. But when taking a further look into the cannabis issue it has more to do with every day life than what appears at face value.  There are multiple layers to this complex issue.  Cannabis and the War on Drugs impacts the economy, citizen’s rights, society, families, the individual user and much more.  It impacts all of us in one way or another many without us realizing it.

With the economy in the shape that it’s currently in, budget cuts rampant, layoffs, department downsizing; cities across the country are having to prioritize and make cuts often deciding which cases are the most important and letting others slide including violent crimes.  With cuts to law enforcement cities across the nation see crimes rates rise and the value decrease which impacts us all.  Each year the government spends billions fighting the War on Drugs. That money could instead be used more wisely.  One wonders then with these limited resources why cannabis, a non lethal plant,  continues to top their priorities list despite saying the administration would do otherwise?

We have spent trillions of dollars fighting this War on Drugs and what we have ended with is a broken country both financially and socially.  The government has criminalized a natural plant and taken a hardened stance against it despite the growing support nationally for legalization especially for medical reasons.  The government has continued to deny any benefits of cannabis and still stands by its classification of it as a scheduled 1 substance along side such hard drugs as heroin and deemed harsher than cocaine.  The government needs to wake up and realize that this war is not worth the cost and needs to end.   That will happen when we come together and make our voices heard.  We need to take this issue to the forefront and make people, make the president, address it.

In the last three years we saw more attacks from the federal government during the Obama administration than those of Presidents Bush and Clinton.  We saw federal raids on legitimate patients and their caregivers.  We saw taxpayer’s money wasted fueling this war on citizens.  We saw the federal government trample all over our rights in its search for criminals, millions who’s only crime was simple possession.

The laws that were passed soon after the 9/11 attacks, that were thought to be used only for the protection against terrorists attacks, have continuously been used in the War against Drugs and American citizens.  The laws have been used more in the search for drugs than for terrorists.  We need to stand up for our rights and demand that use of a plant should not constitute giving up our constitutional rights.

Currently schools across the country are in need of funding and money spent on the War on Drugs could instead go to make our schools excellent again.  By having smart regulations, correct zoning in cities and responsible use, children will not be effected in the manner everyone fears.  Instead of an underground network of criminals you would have a respected cannabis community that is not selling your children drugs. 

The argument for denying legalization for the sake of children may at face value have merit but when looking closer is ridiculous.  Parents need to take a leading role in teaching their children about cannabis, responsibility for choices and the pros and cons of drug use.  This issue of children’s use of cannabis or not is not a government decision but a parental one.  Parents play a huge role in their child’s influences, view towards drugs, access and more.  They should be the one making that decision to restrict cannabis or drug use.

By keeping cannabis illegal you keep it from being regulated which means that the product is out there with no one saying who can and can not have it.  Which also means that the person selling it doesn’t necessarily care how old your kid is when they try to buy pot only if they have the right amount of cash.  Alcohol by contrast, which consequently can be fatal especially to children and teens, is legal, regulated and not readily accessible to children.  Those worried about dispensary signs keep in mind that alcohol is advertised during national sporting events, local radio, TV, movies, billboards and more, giving children much more exposure.

In states across the US there is pending legislation for cannabis use with some aiming to take control and address the obvious problems caused by the War on Drugs.  The state of Washington has a great set up already in place for alcohol which would nicely accommodate the cannabis industry as well.  The citizens have gotten the necessary signatures validated for a legalization initiative for adults 21 and older to consume cannabis to appear before the voters in the November 2012 ballots. This has a great potential for a positive financial impact on the local and state economy allowing for more income, a much-needed relief especially in these times.

With all the facts stacking up against the War on Drugs and the hardened stance against legalization you have to ask yourself why are we continuing this costly war?  We need to address this issue and demand and end to this war.  We must urge our representatives to support rescheduling cannabis and repealing the devastating effects of prohibition.  The fight for legalization has been a long one but with quick action we can take hold of this opportunity and finally achieve our goals.

This guy can afford the War on Drugs (head of Sinola cartel)

7 thoughts on “We Can Not Afford To Continue The War On Drugs

  1. Pingback: South American Leaders Meet in a Summit on the War on Drugs « GoodOleWoody's Blog

  2. Pingback: Individualized Treatments: Key To Cannabis’ Success | Cherry Girl

  3. Pingback: 51 yrs ago today, one of the worlds most destructive treaties came into being, causing endless wars and problems at all levels of society. « ben * ben

  4. No matter where we live in the world there is a need to take away the stigma of illegal drugs. Prohibition is merely creating millionaires and leaving those in need of the drugs homeless, with mental problems and goodness knows what else.
    Perhaps more politicians need to have a family member who is affected by the use of ‘illegal’ drugs – then we might see a change in thinking…….but not for a long time I fear.

  5. Pingback: It Is Time To Start Looking At Cannabis Differently | Cherry Girl

  6. Pingback: Cannabis Prohibition: Is It Really Keeping Our Children Safe? | Cherry Girl

What do you think? Questions, Comments, Opinions?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s