Cannabis and Teens

Since 1975 the “Monitoring the Future” study has recorded the self-reported use of various substances by middle and high school students. Each year it reveals what is really going on with teen drug use.  In 2011 47,000 teens participated with interesting results. Although many, including the US Drug Czar, took the findings as negative and just one more way to attack cannabis use what it revealed was more proof that teens just like most of us want to do what is best for our bodies.

Many Americans today have tried or use cannabis with no adverse side effects.  During the 90s there was a huge push with D.A.R.E. and other programs that educated school children on all dangers of drugs.  With the population becoming more educated on the actual dangers associated with cigarettes, alcohol and other harmful substances we have seen a shift in use.  People including teens  have also realized the real harms and benefits of cannabis as well.

With this realization people have turned to cannabis with its relatively mild side effects and no lasting damage or threat of death.  Data backs up that use of harmful substances such as cocaine, steroids and heroin have steadily fallen down almost 50% from peak.  Alcohol and tobacco use is down 50% as well actually reaching historic lows.  It would seem that the population of teens have weighed out the dangers and chosen for themselves.

Cannabis use by contrast in the last four years has increased but not noticeably.  Some wonder then why many saw this report as a call to action against cannabis.    Some blamed the medical use movement for not only exposure but access as well.  This argument does not entirely hold up.  Medical marijuana was in the mainstream media and nation-wide topic in 1996 when CA first tried to legalize for patients.  Access for minors in states that have legalized has been restricted and taken crime off the streets.

In 2011 it was reported that 6.6% reported consuming cannabis daily which is greater than previously reported.   The attitude towards cannabis by teens as a whole has also changed with about 45% of them viewing cannabis as harmful.  That is a huge difference considering in the early 90s it was at 80%.  One caveat is that during the time from the early 90s and throughout most of 2000 teen use of cannabis also fell.

Anyone who lives in the real world will attest that you can only shield your children for so long before you have to let go and let them make their own choices.  When it comes to that point all the training that they have received will guide them.  Teens will always party and always break the rules.  We will never live in a society where there is not a teenage party going on somewhere.  While I don’t support teen use of cannabis, when weighing out the harms against use of alcohol and other harmful substances I would rather see teens choose a natural plant that does not cause death.

There of course are risks with using cannabis not only from using the drug but also the consequential side effects and one’s actions.  The earlier in one’s life cannabis is used the more potential there is for risks.  With that, when weighing out the cons, the potential risks of using cannabis is far less severe than many other substances including prescriptions.

While Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske and other national media look negatively at the study others walk away with a sense of pride that our nation’s youth are choosing more wisely.  Today more people, including teens, perceive cannabis to be less harmful than alcohol and tobacco.  Someday our leaders will see the light and come to the same conclusion as the rest of us.  The War on Drugs has made cannabis an evil that is not neccessary.

It Is Time, This Is Our Moment

Throughout history there are those moments in time that forever change our course.  Great moments where heroes stood up, fought back, and changed our destinies.  Many led ordinary lives but in that moment found the courage to do what’s right even in the face of adversity.

I believe we are at a very unique point in time.  All over the globe are seeing people wake up to the idea of a more involved society, one that gives them a voice.  We are starting to see the corruption that has been allowed to take hold.  Thanks to instant and world-wide communications we all can share an abundance of information.  The message is clear: People want freedom!

The thought of freedom of self is spreading.  People realize they have a choice.  They can be free to be responsible for themselves and their government.  With God-given free will people are seeking out the truths.  One truth that has frequently come into the spotlight, all over the globe is cannabis.  People are starting to see through the “reefer madness” and seek out the truths not only of its healing powers but of its actual harms.

The U.S. government has wasted trillions of tax-payer’s dollars pursuing a plant put here on earth for humans to use.  Beyond all its myriad of health benefits including exciting research pointing towards curing cancer, cannabis in its natural form can be looked at in the same light as drinking a beer or having a glass of wine.  Many Americans drink at the end of their day to unwind and relax from the day’s activities.  Millions of Americans use cannabis in the same way including using forms such as oils, juices, edibles and tinctures.

It is time to start taking a more serious look at what the real dangers are of cannabis prohibition.  Cannabis does not cause death, is more beneficial and is less harmful than alcohol which is a legal drug for Americans 21 and older.  We need to look at the practicality of prohibition on a national level. This is a serious issue that has devastating effects on millions of Americans.  An issue that breaks up families, bankrupts countless people, destroys American rights, costs trillions of tax-payer dollars and ruins society demands that we take a serious look at this situation and what its doing to this country.

These are the moments that history is made of.  Moments that show of courage and strength.  Times were we came together and fought back.  We need to make our voices heard loud and clear: Its time to talk about the end of prohibition!  We need to tell our representatives that its time to reschedule cannabis and repeal the prohibition.  We need to educate others on the truths.  When people see the truth we will have freedom.  This is our moment will you have the courage to change history?

No Connection Found Between Marijuana and Cancer

This was an article I came across about a study done on the association of cannabis and cancer.

The largest study of its kind has unexpectedly concluded that smoking marijuana, even regularly and heavily, does not lead to lung cancer.

The new findings “were against our expectations,” said Donald Tashkin of the University of California at Los Angeles, a pulmonologist who has studied marijuana for 30 years.

“We hypothesized that there would be a positive association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the association would be more positive with heavier use,” he said. “What we found instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some protective effect.”

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Federal health and drug enforcement officials have widely used Tashkin’s previous work on marijuana to make the case that the drug is dangerous. Tashkin said that while he still believes marijuana is potentially harmful, its cancer-causing effects appear to be of less concern than previously thought.

Earlier work established that marijuana does contain cancer-causing chemicals as potentially harmful as those in tobacco, he said. However, marijuana also contains the chemical THC, which he said may kill aging cells and keep them from becoming cancerous.

Tashkin’s study, funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, involved 1,200 people in Los Angeles who had lung, neck or head cancer and an additional 1,040 people without cancer matched by age, sex and neighborhood.

They were all asked about their lifetime use of marijuana, tobacco and alcohol. The heaviest marijuana smokers had lighted up more than 22,000 times, while moderately heavy usage was defined as smoking 11,000 to 22,000 marijuana cigarettes. Tashkin found that even the very heavy marijuana smokers showed no increased incidence of the three cancers studied.

“This is the largest case-control study ever done, and everyone had to fill out a very extensive questionnaire about marijuana use,” he said. “Bias can creep into any research, but we controlled for as many confounding factors as we could, and so I believe these results have real meaning.”

Tashkin’s group at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA had hypothesized that marijuana would raise the risk of cancer on the basis of earlier small human studies, lab studies of animals, and the fact that marijuana users inhale more deeply and generally hold smoke in their lungs longer than tobacco smokers — exposing them to the dangerous chemicals for a longer time. In addition, Tashkin said, previous studies found that marijuana tar has 50 percent higher concentrations of chemicals linked to cancer than tobacco cigarette tar.

While no association between marijuana smoking and cancer was found, the study findings, presented to the American Thoracic Society International Conference this week, did find a 20-fold increase in lung cancer among people who smoked two or more packs of cigarettes a day.

The study was limited to people younger than 60 because those older than that were generally not exposed to marijuana in their youth, when it is most often tried.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/25/AR2006052501729.html

A Natural Choice For Pain Management

Most people do not know what it is like to be in pain every day but for the millions of Americans that do it can be difficult to live with.  When you wake up and go to sleep in pain it wears on you.  It can cause depression to set in.  When the pain is constant people seek out relief but sometimes find there is no easy answer.

Many seek help from traditional medicine only to find that it is costly, makes symptoms worse or causes unwanted side effects.   Pain management is a booming industry.  America is addicted to pain medications.  15,000 people in 2008 died from overdoses of legal prescription painkillers — more than died from heroin and cocaine overdoses combined.

But there is a natural way to relieve pain and modern science is slowly figuring out what millions already know.  Cannabis is not a new designer drug but has been around for thousands of years.  It was once used medicinally for a myriad of reasons.  With prohibitions for the last 75 years it has been difficult for science to unravel the mysteries.  Below you will see studies that show how cannabis can help with pain management.  Please Share with truth about the CURE!

Cannabinoid Receptors and Pain
The discovery of this ‘endocannabinoid system’ has prompted the development of a range of novel cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, including several that show marked selectivity for CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. The endocannabinoid system has physiological and/or pathophysiological roles in the modulation of pain.”
Cannabinoid receptors and pain.
Pertwee RG. SourceDepartment of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Scotland, Aberdeen, UK. rgp@aberdeen.ac.uk

Abstract
Mammalian tissues contain at least two types of cannabinoid receptor, CB(1) and CB(2), both coupled to G proteins. CB(1) receptors are expressed mainly by neurones of the central and peripheral nervous system whereas CB(2) receptors occur centrally and peripherally in certain non-neuronal tissues, particularly in immune cells. The existence of endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors has also been demonstrated. The discovery of this ‘endocannabinoid system’ has prompted the development of a range of novel cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, including several that show marked selectivity for CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. It has also been paralleled by a renewed interest in cannabinoid-induced antinociception. This review summarizes current knowledge about the ability of cannabinoids to produce antinociception in animal models of acute pain as well as about the ability of these drugs to suppress signs of tonic pain induced in animals by nerve damage or by the injection of an inflammatory agent. Particular attention is paid to the types of pain against which cannabinoids may be effective, the distribution pattern of cannabinoid receptors in central and peripheral pain pathways and the part that these receptors play in cannabinoid-induced antinociception. The possibility that antinociception can be mediated by cannabinoid receptors other than CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, for example CB(2)-like receptors, is also discussed as is the evidence firstly that one endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, produces antinociception through mechanisms that differ from those of other types of cannabinoid, for example by acting on vanilloid receptors, and secondly that the endocannabinoid system has physiological and/or pathophysiological roles in the modulation of pain.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11164622 

The Future of Cannabinoids As Analgesic Agents: A Pharmacologic, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Overview
Cannabinoid receptor agonists and/or molecules that affect the modulation of endocannabinoid synthesis, metabolism, and transport may, in the future, offer extremely valuable tools for the treatment of a number of currently intractable disorders.”— So, in the future, cannabis will be an “extremely valuable tool for treating a number of currently intractable disorders.
The future of cannabinoids as analgesic agents: a pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic overview. McCarberg BH, Barkin RL. SourceFamily Medicine Kaiser Permanente, Escondido, California, USA. Bill.H.Mccarberg@kp.org

Abstract
For thousands of years, physicians and their patients employed cannabis as a therapeutic agent. Despite this extensive historical usage, in the Western world, cannabis fell into disfavor among medical professionals because the technology available in the 1800s and early 1900s did not permit reliable, standardized preparations to be developed. However, since the discovery and cloning of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) in the 1990s, scientific interest in the area has burgeoned, and the complexities of this fascinating receptor system, and its endogenous ligands, have been actively explored. Recent studies reveal that cannabinoids have a rich pharmacology and may interact with a number of other receptor systems-as well as with other cannabinoids-to produce potential synergies. Cannabinoids-endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids-affect numerous bodily functions and have indicated efficacy of varying degrees in a number of serious medical conditions. Nevertheless, despite promising preclinical and early clinical data, particularly in the areas of inflammation and nociception, development challenges abound. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other CB1 receptor agonists can have an undesirable CNS impact, and, in many cases, dose optimization may not be realizable before onset of excessive side effects. In addition, complex botanically derived cannabinoid products must satisfy the demanding criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Association’s approval process. Recent agency guidance suggests that these obstacles are not insurmountable, although cannabis herbal material (“medical marijuana”) may present fatal uncertainties of quality control and dosage standardization. Therefore, formulation, composition, and delivery system issues will affect the extent to which a particular cannabinoid product may have a desirable risk-benefit profile and acceptable abuse liability potential. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and/or molecules that affect the modulation of endocannabinoid synthesis, metabolism, and transport may, in the future, offer extremely valuable tools for the treatment of a number of currently intractable disorders. Further research is warranted to explore the therapeutic potential of this area.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17890938

Role of Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Pain and (Painful) Spasticity
In chronic pain and (painful) spasticity, an increasing number of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have shown the efficacy of cannabinoids. Patients with unsatisfactory response to other methods of pain therapy and who were characterized by failed stress adaptation particularly benefited from treatment with cannabinoids. Different methods of administration and other types of cannabinoids, such as endocannabinoid modulators, should be tested in future trials.
Role of cannabinoids in the treatment of pain and (painful) spasticity.
Karst M, Wippermann S, Ahrens J. SourceDepartment of Anaesthesiology, Pain Clinic, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. karst.matthias@mh-hannover.de

Abstract
Both the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) and its role in the control of pain and habituation to stress, as well as the significant analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects in animal studies, suggest the usefulness of cannabinoids in pain conditions. However, in human experimental or clinical trials, no convincing reduction of acute pain, which may be caused by a pronociceptive, ECS-triggered mechanism on the level of the spinal cord, has been demonstrated. In contrast, in chronic pain and (painful) spasticity, an increasing number of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have shown the efficacy of cannabinoids, which is combined with a narrow therapeutic index. Patients with unsatisfactory response to other methods of pain therapy and who were characterized by failed stress adaptation particularly benefited from treatment with cannabinoids. None of the attempts to overcome the disadvantage of the narrow therapeutic index, either by changing the route of application or by formulating balanced cannabinoid preparations, have resulted in a major breakthrough. Therefore, different methods of administration and other types of cannabinoids, such as endocannabinoid modulators, should be tested in future trials.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21142261

The Role of Endocannabinoids in Pain Modulation and the Therapeutic Potential of Inhibiting Their Enzymatic Degradation
The EndoCANNABINOID SYSTEM modulates pain. Cannabinoids inhibit FAAH and MAGL.
The Role of Endocannabinoids in Pain Modulation and the Therapeutic Potential of Inhibiting their Enzymatic Degradation. Alvarez-Jaimes LJ, Palmer JA. SourceJohnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row,San Diego, CA 92121, USA. jpalmer9@its.jnj.co.

Abstract
The need for new pain therapies that provide greater relief without unwanted side-effects drives the search for new drug targets. The identification of endogenous lipid ligands for the two known cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2)) has led to numerous studies investigating the role of these endocannabinoids in pain processes. The two most widely studied endocannabinoids are anandamide (AEA; arachidonoyl ethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2 AG), but there are also a number of structurally related endogenous lipid signaling molecules that are agonists at cannabinoid and non-cannabinoid receptors. These lipid signaling molecules are not stored in synaptic vesicles, but are synthesized and released on-demand and act locally, as they are rapidly inactivated. This suggests that there may be therapeutic potential in modulating levels of these ligands to only have effects in active neural pathways, thereby reducing the potential for side-effects that result from widespread systemic cannabinoid receptor activation. One approach to modulate the levels and duration of action of these lipid signaling molecules is to target the enzymes responsible for their hydrolysis. The two main enzymes responsible for hydrolysis of these lipid signaling molecules are fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglyceride lipase (MGL). This article will discuss the role of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of pain and will review the current understanding of the properties of the hydrolytic enzymes and the recent advances in developing inhibitors for these targets, with particular relevance to the treatment of pain.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21466449

Cannabinoids For Pain Management
Cannabinoids have been used for thousands of years to provide relief from suffering. Adverse effects are not uncommon with cannabinoids, though most are not serious and self-limiting. In view of the limited effect size and low but not inconsequential risk of serious adverse events, cannabinoids should be employed as analgesics only when safer and more effective medication trials have failed, or as part of a multimodal treatment regimen-In other words: Cannabinoids, which are safe and effective for pain, should only be used after you’ve tried all of Big Phama’s failed drugs, or in combination with Big Pharma.
Cannabinoids for pain management. Thaler A, Gupta A, Cohen SP.
SourcePain Management Division, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 21029, USA.

Abstract
Cannabinoids have been used for thousands of years to provide relief from suffering, but only recently have they been critically evaluated in clinical trials. This review provides an in-depth examination of the evidence supporting cannabinoids in various pain states, along with an overview of potential adverse effects. In summary, there is strong evidence for a moderate analgesic effect in peripheral neuropathic and central pain conditions, and conflicting evidence for their use in nociceptive pain. For spasticity, most controlled studies demonstrate significant improvement. Adverse effects are not uncommon with cannabinoids, though most are not serious and self-limiting. In view of the limited effect size and low but not inconsequential risk of serious adverse events, cannabinoids should be employed as analgesics only when safer and more effective medication trials have failed, or as part of a multimodal treatment regimen.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21508629

The Role of Central and Peripheral Cannabinoid1 Receptors In the Antihyperalgesic Activity of Cannabinoids In A Model of Neuropathic Pain 
These data show that cannabinoids are highly potent and efficacious antihyperalgesic agents in a model of neuropathic pain. This activity is likely to be mediated via an action in both the CNS and in the periphery.
The role of central and peripheral Cannabinoid1 receptors in the antihyperalgesic activity of cannabinoids in a model of neuropathic pain.
Fox A, Kesingland A, Gentry C, McNair K, Patel S, Urban L, James I.
SourceNovartis Institute for Medical Sciences, 5 Gower Place, WC1E 6BN, London, UK. alyson.fox@pharma.novartis.com

Abstract
We have examined the effects of cannabinoid agonists on hyperalgesia in a model of neuropathic pain in the rat and investigated the possible sites of action. The antihyperalgesic activity of the cannabinoids was compared with their ability to elicit behavioural effects characteristic of central cannabinoid activity. WIN55,212-2 (0.3-10 mg kg(-1)), CP-55,940 (0.03-1 mg kg(-1)) and HU-210 (0.001-0.03 mg kg(-1)) were all active in a ‘tetrad’ of tests consisting of tail-flick, catalepsy, rotarod and hypothermia following subcutaneous administration, with a rank order of potency in each of HU-210 > CP-55,940 > WIN55,212-2. The effects of WIN55,212-2 in each assay were blocked by the Cannabinoid1 (CB1) antagonist SR141716A. In the partial sciatic ligation model of neuropathic pain WIN55,212-2, CP-55,940 and HU-210 produced complete reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia within 3 h of subcutaneous administration with D50 values of 0.52, 0.08 and 0.005 mg kg(-1), respectively. In this model WIN55,212-2 was also effective against thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. WIN55,212-2 produced pronounced reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia following intrathecal administration that was blocked by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. Following intraplantar administration into the ipsilateral hindpaw, WIN55,212-2 produced up to 70% reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia, although activity was also observed at high doses following injection into the contralateral paw. The antihyperalgesic effect of WIN55,212-2 injected into the ipsilateral paw was blocked by subcutaneously administered SR141716A, but was not affected by intrathecally administered SR141716A. These data show that cannabinoids are highly potent and efficacious antihyperalgesic agents in a model of neuropathic pain. This activity is likely to be mediated via an action in both the CNS and in the periphery.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11323130

 

Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists As Analgesic Agents
Increasing data emerging from controlled clinical trials support an analgesic activity of cannabinoids. However, the psychotropic side effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol or synthetic derivatives essentially puts a brake on their use.”– In other words: Cannabinoids CURE pain, but we cannot have THe Cure because of the side-effects of THC, such as euphoria (feeling good), increased appetite, and temporary memory loss.
Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptor agonists as analgesic agents.
Fox A, Bevan S. SourceNovartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Chronic Pain Unit, 5 Gower Place, London WC1E 6BS, UK. alyson.fox@.novartis.com

Abstract
Increasing data emerging from controlled clinical trials support an analgesic activity of cannabinoids. However, the psychotropic side effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol or synthetic derivatives essentially puts a brake on their use, possibly limiting the degree of analgesia that can be achieved as well as providing regulatory hurdles. Animal studies show that although these side effects are mediated via central cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptors, the analgesic activity in chronic pain states may be mediated via spinal CB(1) and potentially CB(2) receptors, as well as peripheral CB(1) and CB2 receptors on sensory nerves or immune cells. The design of novel compounds that either specifically target peripheral CB(1) receptors or display high selectivity for CB(2) receptors may offer avenues for harnessing the analgesic effect of CB receptor agonists while avoiding the central adverse events seen with cannabinoid structures. Clinical trials with such compounds are required to determine whether either approach can provide the level of analgesia required to fulfil the unmet medical need left by current therapies for chronic pain.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16004597


Prohibition: Then and Now, History Repeating Itself?

We see Hollywood glamorizing the roaring 20’s, Prohibition Era, with the speakeasies and flapper girls. Then there was Al Capone and the mob’s criminal activities. Today, with the Drug Prohibition, we have stories of bodies being dumped in the streets and heads being found on school playgrounds. Can we not learn from history?

During the Prohibition Era which lasted from 1920 to 1933, people truly thought that passing more laws would make things safer and better.  They felt that alcohol was the cause of many social issues and if it were illegal things would improve.  Unfortunately it had the opposite affect.

Suddenly with liquor being available only through the black markets, criminals organized and gangs were created.  What were once legally run production, importation and distribution businesses were now taken over by gangs.

As a result of the prohibition prices went up further fueling more attraction to gangs who became rich.  Once gangs took hold of the industry fights broke out over territory and connections, spilling crime into the streets including mass murder.


A Bill was created in Congress that celebrated the Repeal day which notes that “throughout American history, alcohol has been consumed by its citizens”;that prohibition resulted in “abuses” and the “irresponsible over consumption of alcohol”; and that the ban on “‘intoxicating liquors’ in the United States, resulted in a dramatic increase in illegal activity, including unsafe black market alcohol production, organized crime, and noncompliance with alcohol laws…”

While prohibition was a complete failure one thing we can learn from them is that they did go through the proper processes.  With prohibition activists worked their way from the local level to the federal level eventually amending the constitution. When America repealed prohibition with a constitutional amendment it explicitly gave the power to regulate alcohol to the states.

In contrast to the drug prohibition, Congress as well as the Supreme court, was not Constitutional when it passed the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 which started the modern day Drug War.

Crime was not the only factor in the failure of prohibition.  The lack of regulation was also a problem.  Unlike the regulated liquor, black market liquor was more potent and more harmful.  Today we have unregulated marijuana that is available to the public causing concerns.  Harmful chemicals, mold and many other issues can have serious effects on the end user as well as the enviroment. Without proper regulation patients can find it hard to get safe, quality marijuana.

During the Prohibition Era doctors were still able to prescribe it to their patients unlike today where dispensaries, doctors and patients  are being terrorized by raids. After almost 40 years since the Controlled Substance Act passed there are hundreds of thousands of people in prison for nonviolent drug crimes. We have federal and local  police forces that all too often acts like an military force with nearly a trillion dollars spent on enforcement. All the while the street prices of drugs like cocaine and marijuana has dramatically dropped since the government began keeping track in the early 1980s.

H.R. 2306, entitled the ‘Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2011,’ prohibits the federal government from prosecuting adults who use or possess marijuana by removing the plant, and its primary psychoactive constituent, THC, from the five schedules of the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970.  It is currently being cosponsored by 16 Congresspeople.

There are plenty of lessons to learn from the Prohibition Era as well as the Drug War thus far.  As they always say history will repeat itself if you never learn from it.  Prohibition does not work, as proven, it has the opposite effect. Now is the time to stop the corruption and end Prohibition against marijuana.