Cannabis Prohibition: Is It Really Keeping Our Children Safe?

Many a bored teen will hang out with friends and be faced with choosing to use drugs or not.  Many government officials as well as parents tout the War on Drugs as a savior to our children.  They say that it keeps the drugs out of the hands of minors, off the streets and out of schools.  With the economy shining a spotlight onto finances one can quickly see how big of a budget the War on Drugs consumes.  With taking all the different facets of this war into account some wonder if its really working.

The War on Drugs has been waging for over 40 years.  It has cost the tax-payers over $14 trillion, billions annually.  There have been surges and wanes over the 40 years in intensity in the pursuit to eradicate drug use.  Over the years we have witnessed many tragedies and successes.  We have seen harmful drug use drop among the population but especially minors.  We have also seen over the last 18 months an intensity like never before in the use of intimidation tactics, SWAT style raids against state legal patients, abuse, or lethal force when pursuing cannabis users.

With more education and information available to teens today many are able to see through the hypocrisy and lies.  Teens can see you are lying especially when they try cannabis, realize that it is not going to kill them and that they actually like the effects.  With alcohol, who’s effects are similar to cannabis but with much more harm at stake, not only available for sale but advertised everywhere including major sports events it is hard to see the difference.  When they see you are lying about cannabis they question other “truths” you have been telling them.

Simple cannabis possession or other non-violent cannabis related offenses can claim your driver’s license, student loans, subsidized housing, or federal grants.  It can jail a parent or guardian even if they are state and county legal.  With a parent jailed it costs tax-payers more to incarcerate and breaks up a family where the children are thrown into the broken foster care system.  All of us should be asking if this is really what is best for our children.

Children that go into the system cost tax-payers millions each year.  It costs the child emotionally and psychologically.   Children that grow up in the system are bounced around to different homes causing them to act out, perform poorly in school, drop out, get into legal trouble and end up repeating their parents mistakes.  Should we really treat cannabis related offenses this harshly?  Are these tactics really working?

Cannabis use was slightly higher this year but more harmful drugs, including alcohol, were reportedly down according to a recent study among teens use.  Those that take a quick look around or have a conversation with a teen will learn how easily drugs are accessible.  Each year D.E.A. officials boast of their catches but in reality they have barely scratched the surface.  Even with officials raiding and confiscating thousands of plants, California’s number one cash crop was still cannabis.  The plain truth is that it is a plant that can be grown in anyone’s home.  It can be kept from anyone’s knowledge provided the grower is smart.  It can be accessed through many avenues including access through children.

Drug cartels have taken notice of America’s love of drugs and has very outstretched networks that effect our children.  The violence and corruption that comes along with the cartels are infiltrating our schools.  The cartels lure children with money or threats using them as drug runners, smugglers or sellers.  They know that if children are caught the punishment is less.  The also know that it takes less money to impress children.  In this way they have been able to utilize children to sell to others including their peers thus spurring not only more drug use but recruiting even more children.

California has a heavily burdened prison and welfare system.  They have a large amount of incarcerated inmates for cannabis related crimes.  Our nation has been fighting this war for far too long.  Even our children see the truth about cannabis.  Isn’t it time we started talking about this subject from a new perspective?  Our law enforcement agencies have received cuts across the states including here in California.  Our streets are not safer.  Drug use has not been eradicated even after over 40 years.  Families are broken, children are effected, states are bankrupt and in the end drugs are still easily accessible at any school.  Isn’t it time we end the War on Drugs and start with a new approach?

Dear Mr. President

I know this year is a very important year for you.  It is just as important for millions of Americans across the nation.  I write to ask you a question.  In an election year that many feel is vital we would like to know why the issue of cannabis has not been properly discussed?  I have read the releases from the administration but it fails to properly address our concerns.  The issue has been ignored at many venues where it was the leading question.

After 40 years of this War on Drugs where have we gotten and was it worth it?  In this economy many people are hurting and everyone is looking for ways to save money.  The War on Drugs cost taxpayers billions of dollars each year and is responsible for many tragic stories.

Not only has it cost us money but it has cost us as a society as well.  Millions of Americans have been shuffled through the judicial system destroying their lives many for simple possession.  This problem has also exposed racial divides and furthered the tension in the country.  People have lost faith in law enforcement in many cities.  In Mexico over 50,000 have died in the last 6 years directly resulting from this war.  The Cartels are getting richer and the demand is still there.

There is a sizable and growing group of supporters across the nation.  75% support medical use and the number for legalization for adults over 21 is rapidly growing.  In this economy where many are downsizing the cannabis industry is booming.  The states that have legalized cannabis have seen a sharp increase in revenue both in taxes and fees as well as residual income for local communities.  When properly regulated and implemented we have seen excellent examples shine through.

Consumers no longer want to go to the street corner dealer but instead enjoy the safety and security of dispensaries.  There patients can find natural, organic strain choices with professional help and options in consumption.  They can feel confident that they are paying taxes and contributing towards the community instead of the black market.

With legalization comes regulation which assists in restricting access to minors.  Today minors are restricted from buying and accessing alcohol on their own due to strict regulations.  We have seen the devastating effects that alcohol prohibition caused.  Since its repeal we have also seen the effects that it has had on this nation.  From responsible use to fatalities from car accidents, consumption and domestic violence alcohol has been responsible.  Today alcohol is advertised during major sporting events, radio, TV, movies billboards and more exposing children at a young age.

There is too much proof both in scientific studies and in testimonies to deny the many benefits of cannabis.   With the knowledge we have gained so far patients of all kinds have found relief with cannabis.  We have also seen miraculous cases such as Cash Hyde overcome childhood cancer.  We have come much further than smoking on a Friday night but rather uncovered just the surface of what looks to be exciting and promising discoveries.

With all these factors in mind our community is wondering why our our President and candidates, who are vying for the highest power in the country for the next four years  and who directly effect this issue, continue to ignore us?  We want to know why an issue that directly effects millions and indirectly effects us all would not be considered?

We are looking for a leader who is willing to stand up to the opposition and show people that legalization can be done responsibly with regulations and state approval.  We need a leader who will take us seriously and address our needs.  We are looking for that leader this year and it is for that reason it needs to be addressed.  Millions of voters are waiting it is time to address cannabis.

Corruption Through the Ages

It is said that if history is not learned it is doomed to repeat itself.  It is important to look back and know how we got here today.  We have looked at how Prohibition of Alcohol can be applied to today’s War on Drugs.  We have also looked at the current Drug War in terms of stats on arrests and how much money is wasted.  Now we will take a look at how the Banking System has played a role in the drug trade and the War on Drugs. If you study the timeline below you will see how corruption has a firm grip where ever there is money. In the past 10 years there has been major corruption linking the banking system and drug cartels.  This is just one key point in the War on Drugs and our fight for legalization.  Money does have control and it is vital to know all aspects when fighting for legalization.  In the timeline you will notice underline text.  These are areas that I encourage to be further researched as there is a lot of interesting history to be discovered.  Please Share: just click on the image below to read~ Cherry Girl

Also available in High Resolution

Adapted from “Banking Laid Bare” Steven Hager ~ High Times Dec 2011

Wachovia and J.P. Morgan connection to Slave Trade: http://www.ushistory.org/presidentshouse/news/ww061005.htm 

Prohibition: Then and Now, History Repeating Itself?

We see Hollywood glamorizing the roaring 20’s, Prohibition Era, with the speakeasies and flapper girls. Then there was Al Capone and the mob’s criminal activities. Today, with the Drug Prohibition, we have stories of bodies being dumped in the streets and heads being found on school playgrounds. Can we not learn from history?

During the Prohibition Era which lasted from 1920 to 1933, people truly thought that passing more laws would make things safer and better.  They felt that alcohol was the cause of many social issues and if it were illegal things would improve.  Unfortunately it had the opposite affect.

Suddenly with liquor being available only through the black markets, criminals organized and gangs were created.  What were once legally run production, importation and distribution businesses were now taken over by gangs.

As a result of the prohibition prices went up further fueling more attraction to gangs who became rich.  Once gangs took hold of the industry fights broke out over territory and connections, spilling crime into the streets including mass murder.


A Bill was created in Congress that celebrated the Repeal day which notes that “throughout American history, alcohol has been consumed by its citizens”;that prohibition resulted in “abuses” and the “irresponsible over consumption of alcohol”; and that the ban on “‘intoxicating liquors’ in the United States, resulted in a dramatic increase in illegal activity, including unsafe black market alcohol production, organized crime, and noncompliance with alcohol laws…”

While prohibition was a complete failure one thing we can learn from them is that they did go through the proper processes.  With prohibition activists worked their way from the local level to the federal level eventually amending the constitution. When America repealed prohibition with a constitutional amendment it explicitly gave the power to regulate alcohol to the states.

In contrast to the drug prohibition, Congress as well as the Supreme court, was not Constitutional when it passed the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 which started the modern day Drug War.

Crime was not the only factor in the failure of prohibition.  The lack of regulation was also a problem.  Unlike the regulated liquor, black market liquor was more potent and more harmful.  Today we have unregulated marijuana that is available to the public causing concerns.  Harmful chemicals, mold and many other issues can have serious effects on the end user as well as the enviroment. Without proper regulation patients can find it hard to get safe, quality marijuana.

During the Prohibition Era doctors were still able to prescribe it to their patients unlike today where dispensaries, doctors and patients  are being terrorized by raids. After almost 40 years since the Controlled Substance Act passed there are hundreds of thousands of people in prison for nonviolent drug crimes. We have federal and local  police forces that all too often acts like an military force with nearly a trillion dollars spent on enforcement. All the while the street prices of drugs like cocaine and marijuana has dramatically dropped since the government began keeping track in the early 1980s.

H.R. 2306, entitled the ‘Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2011,’ prohibits the federal government from prosecuting adults who use or possess marijuana by removing the plant, and its primary psychoactive constituent, THC, from the five schedules of the federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970.  It is currently being cosponsored by 16 Congresspeople.

There are plenty of lessons to learn from the Prohibition Era as well as the Drug War thus far.  As they always say history will repeat itself if you never learn from it.  Prohibition does not work, as proven, it has the opposite effect. Now is the time to stop the corruption and end Prohibition against marijuana.